Royal Dirkzwager and Vissim to remotely monitor ONE-Dyas offshore platforms in Dutch and UK sector

Royal Dirkzwager and Vissim are again partnering to provide Remote Offshore Asset Monitoring (ROAM) services to Holland’s largest privately owned energy company: ONE-Dyas B.V. Vissim’s integrated vessel tracking and voice communication systems will enable the centralised remote monitoring of ONE-Dyas’ offshore platforms in both the UK and Dutch sector of the North Sea. Royal Dirkzwager’s Control Room Operators will perform 24/7 monitoring from their Maritime Control Room in Maassluis, The Netherlands. ROAM is a cost effective and proven service designed to monitor the maritime traffic around a wide range of offshore assets such as Oil & Gas platforms and wind farms in order to minimize environmental and operational risks.

 

Paul Wieland, Director at Royal Dirkzwager, explains ‘we are thrilled to see ONE-Dyas partner with us for their safety and surveillance needs. ROAM was developed over the last six years and has a growing reputation as the partner of-choice for remote asset monitoring. One-Dyas is particularly exciting for us as it requires us to provide services to both their UK and Dutch operations. Vissim’s system is designed to scale as needed and can easily handle multiple surveillance areas. We look forward to further developing our partnership with Vissim and welcoming our new customer ONE-Dyas to the ROAM service.

 

Per Arne Henæs, Vissim’s CEO, added that Vissim is also pleased to support another customer with long-term partner Royal Dirkzwager ‘The joint service is an attractive proposition for offshore operators, particularly in the North Sea. Increases in marine traffic can cause regular collision potential with these platforms leading to costly production shutdowns or environmental accidents. Digitizing offshore operations with ROAM is helping operators like ONE-Dyas reduce their overall costs and emissions while not compromising safety. We believe there are a growing number of operators around the UK and Holland who could benefit from this service.’